Search results for "Venous thromboembolism"


 
Results 1 - 10 of about 102 for "Venous thromboembolism".
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MKSAP Quiz: Screening after prostate cancer diagnosis

A 65-year-old man is evaluated after being diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer. He is asymptomatic. Transrectal ultrasound biopsy showed multiple foci of prostate cancer in both lobes with the highest Gleason score of 8. Following a physical exam, tests, and treatment, what is the most appropriate screening test to perform next?
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2024/06/25/3.htm
25 Jun 2024

Managing DOACs in primary care

Primary care physicians play a crucial role in ongoing anticoagulation management, including educating patients about the signs of venous thromboembolism.
https://immattersacp.org/archives/2022/04/managing-doacs-in-primary-care.htm
1 Apr 2022

Patients with provoked VTE often on anticoagulation longer than recommended

Three variables were associated with receiving anticoagulation for longer than three months after a provoked venous thromboembolism (VTE): direct oral anticoagulant use, history of VTE, and history of myocardial infarction.
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2022/11/01/4.htm
1 Nov 2022

New resource offers pearls for perioperative medicine

A recent book addresses perioperative medicine, including how to be a perioperative consultant, prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism, coexisting medical problems, and common postoperative complications.
https://immattersacp.org/archives/2022/02/new-resource-offers-pearls-for-perioperative-medicine.htm
1 Feb 2022

Apixaban shows superior effectiveness, safety compared to rivaroxaban

For patients with venous thromboembolism, initiation of apixaban was associated with lower rates of recurrence and intracranial and gastrointestinal bleeding than rivaroxaban in a population-based cohort study.
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2021/12/07/2.htm
7 Dec 2021

DOACs may be safe, effective for VTE prevention in patients with higher weight, BMI

Patients with first-time venous thromboembolism (VTE) who weighed 120 kg or more and had a body mass index (BMI) of 40 kg/m2 or more were not at higher risk for bleeding or recurrent VTE with direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) versus warfarin.
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2021/11/09/4.htm
9 Nov 2021

Pros, cons of prolonged anticoagulation after a clot

Experts debate about provoked vs. unprovoked venous thromboembolism, and whether a once-high-risk patient can have that status removed later.
https://immattersacp.org/archives/2020/02/pros-cons-of-prolonged-anticoagulation-after-a-clot.htm
1 Feb 2020

Long-term anticoagulation after first unprovoked VTE associated with considerable bleeding risk

Results from a systematic review and meta-analysis provide a framework for clinicians and patients to balance the benefits and harms of extended anticoagulation for unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE).
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2021/09/14/4.htm
14 Sep 2021

Latest COVID-19 research on VTE risk, treatment with metformin, ivermectin, fluvoxamine

Unvaccinated patients may have higher risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) when mildly ill, one study found, while another showed no effect from metformin, ivermectin, or fluvoxamine. Research supported the safety of the mRNA vaccines, and the NIH updated its treatment guidelines.
https://immattersacp.org/weekly/archives/2022/08/23/4.htm
23 Aug 2022

MKSAP Quiz: ED evaluation for midsternal pain

A 59-year-old woman is evaluated in the emergency department for midsternal chest pain. The pain began several hours ago as a vague ache in her left upper sternal region that progressed in intensity and severity. The pain abated spontaneously after approximately 45 minutes. She had no further chest pain until several hours later, when it recurred unprovoked by exertion. She has no shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, syncope, previous history of chest pain, or known cardiac disease or risk factors for venous thromboembolism. Medical history is significant for hyperlipidemia and hypertension. She does not smoke cigarettes. Medications are simvastatin, aspirin, lisinopril, and hydrochlorothiazide. Following a physical exam, electrocardiogram and chest radiograph, what is the most appropriate initial management?.
https://immattersacp.org/archives/2014/04/mksap.htm
1 Apr 2014

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